Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida (left) drinks water during a House of Councillors budget committee session in Tokyo on Dec. 16. (Kyodo)

KYODO NEWS

TOKYO —  Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida said Thursday he has no plans to attend the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics while suggesting he is still considering various options over the U.S.-led diplomatic boycott of the games.

“At the moment, I have no plans to attend,” Kishida said in parliament when asked about whether he will travel to China for the February games by Shinkun Haku, a lawmaker of the main opposition Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan.

But Kishida followed up by saying, “It is important to make a judgment by myself at an appropriate time after comprehensively taking into account various issues in consideration of the national interest.”

Later Thursday, China lambasted Japan, saying any attempt to politicize sports is against the spirit of the Olympic Charter.

“China is confident of hosting a simple, safe and exciting Olympic event” in Beijing, Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin told reporters.

Kishida’s remarks in the House of Councillors’ Budget Committee meeting came after the U.S. announced it is not sending officials to the games amid intensifying criticism of China’s human rights record.

So far, the diplomatic boycott has been joined by such countries as Australia, Britain and Canada, while France said last week it will not boycott in a break from other Group of Seven industrialized nations. Paris is due to host the Summer Games in 2024.

Meanwhile, Russian President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday expressed his willingness to attend the opening ceremony of the Olympics.

Japan, a close U.S. ally that relies heavily on China in economic terms, is considering not sending Cabinet ministers to the Beijing Olympics.

Various options are being mulled including sending Seiko Hashimoto, an upper house lawmaker and president of the organizing committee of the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics, or Japanese Olympic Committee head Yasuhiro Yamashita, according to government and ruling party sources.

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